Letters: Hot Dogs Hot Dogs and the best way to serve them to small children was the hot topic from Monday's show. Robert Siegel reads listeners' e-mails on a proposed redesign of the weiner to reduce the chance of children choking.
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Letters: Hot Dogs

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Letters: Hot Dogs

Letters: Hot Dogs

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Now, time for your comments about yesterday's program, and holy hot dog, did we receive lots of letters about redesigning the humble frankfurter. Some pediatricians believe that changing the shape or the size or the texture of the hot dog will keep children from choking on hot dogs. So, I spoke yesterday with Eric Hummel of Hummel Brothers Meat Products. And he said, when his kids were little, he always cut up their hot dogs. He also said this.

Mr. ERIC HUMMEL (Marketing Director, Hummel Brothers Meat Products): The recommendation that we always give families with young children is to make sure that the hot dog itself is a skinless hot dog and you try to buy the skinniest ones that we make.

SIEGEL: Well, Maurice Wilson(ph) of Charlotte, North Carolina, writes: That is bad advice. The danger of the hot dog lies in the fact that when cut up, it is a round disc and therefore it fits perfectly into the esophagus of a child. Wilson goes on to say: A better solution would be to cut the hot dog lengthwise, and then cut it to make a semi-circular or triangular shape.

Well, we heard from dozens of moms and dads trumpeting this cut-it-lengthwise solution over a wiener redesign. Nancy Everett(ph) of San Diego, California is one of them. She asks: People, what's wrong with us? This is not rocket science. Just use common sense and leave the poor hot dog alone.

On a different topic, several of you praised my interview with Jeff Bakalar, who writes about video games. We talked about online gaming and what to do when other players make offensive comments.

Mr. JEFF BAKALAR (Reporter, CNET): Players can take action against those people who are violating their terms of service, whether it be misogynistic tones or racist - what have you. There are rules in place. There are provisions that allow you to report these incidents that happen.

SIEGEL: Well, Jake Thaggard(ph) of Raleigh, North Carolina, writes this: I hope that this report will make gamers think twice about what they say online and realize that the other person, regardless of location or distance, is still a person and deserves the same respect as if they were playing right next to you.

Well, keep your letters coming. You can write to us at npr.org.

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