Canadians Say No To Changing Anthem's Words Canada's national anthem includes the words "True patriot love in all thy sons command." Some members of Canada's government perceived a gender bias, and proposed a change that would account for the country's daughters too. That didn't sit well with Canadians. After a public outcry the government dropped the idea — just two days after it was proposed.
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Canadians Say No To Changing Anthem's Words

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Canadians Say No To Changing Anthem's Words

Canadians Say No To Changing Anthem's Words

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

If you paid attention to this year's Winter Olympics, you probably heard these lyrics: O Canada! Our home and native land! True patriot love in all thy sons command.

Some members of Canada's government perceived a gender bias, and proposed a change that would account for the country's daughters. That didn't sit well with Canadians, though. After a public outcry the government dropped the idea -just two days after it was proposed.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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