Restaurant Serves World War II Rationing Cuisine Visitors to the Imperial War Museum in London can taste hard times. The museum's cafe is offering an authentic war-time menu, using recipes people came up with to cope with the lack of basic staples during the Second World War. The menu includes cake made of cocoa and beets.
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Restaurant Serves World War II Rationing Cuisine

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Restaurant Serves World War II Rationing Cuisine

Restaurant Serves World War II Rationing Cuisine

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

A museum in London has an exhibition that caters to these hard economic times. And our last word is: a taste of austerity.

Unidentified Man: There's lots of potatoes about now, and at pre-war prices, too.

MONTAGNE: The show recalls the 14 years of food rationing that the British endured, starting in 1940. Now, at the Imperial War Museum, visitors can taste hard times. The museum's cafe is offering an authentic war-time menu, using the inventive recipes people came up with to cope with the lack of basic staples. The menu includes cake made of cocoa and beets, and scones covered not with real cream, but a dollop of whipped margarine and sugar known as Mock cream.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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