N.Y. City Mayor Bloomberg Chauffeured To Subway New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg brags about taking the subway to work almost every day. But a curious New York Times reporter followed the mayor and found out that Bloomberg gets a little help each morning from a pair of king-size Chevrolet Suburbans.
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N.Y. City Mayor Bloomberg Chauffeured To Subway

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N.Y. City Mayor Bloomberg Chauffeured To Subway

N.Y. City Mayor Bloomberg Chauffeured To Subway

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg likes to get his picture taken right in the subway. He gives interviews on the trains, extolling the virtues of public transit. The New York Times reports this week that when Mayor Bloomberg rides the Lexington Avenue line - he was there a couple of times a week - he doesn't get on at 77th Street, the station nearest his home. No. He's picked up by two king-size Chevy Suburbans and driven 22 blocks to the station at 59th in Lex, just outside of Bloomingdales.

The mayor thus avoids having to start and stop in a local train or transferring to the express at 59th Street. As any subway rider can tell you, it's the transfers that can kill you. The Times implied that the mayor has invited scrutiny of his commute by proposing a plan to tax large vehicles like Suburbans to drive in Manhattan.

The Times said its reporters staked out Mayor Bloomberg's home each morning for five weeks to develop its front-page story. Five weeks to watch a man get into his car. I think I know why Rupert Murdoch just bought the Wall Street Journal.

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