Study: Women Condemned for Anger at Work A Yale University study shows when men get angry at work they may be admired, but women are likely to be seen as "out of control." The study's author thinks this fact could have an impact on the presidential race. Last year, a top Republican said Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-NY, was "too angry to be elected president."
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Study: Women Condemned for Anger at Work

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Study: Women Condemned for Anger at Work

Study: Women Condemned for Anger at Work

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

When women do work full time, they only make 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. And if that makes you mad, you better not show it if you're a woman.

Our last word in business today comes from a study at Yale University. It finds that when men get angry at work they may be admired for it, but when a woman shows anger, she's likely to be seen as, quote, "out of control." The study's author thinks this effect could enter into the presidential race. After all, last year a top Republican said Hillary Clinton was, quote, "too angry to be elected president."

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