Salvation Army Returns Cremated Ashes An Elmira, N.Y., woman who sold a ceramic turtle at a yard sale before realizing the ashes of her husband's first wife were it got some publicity for her drive to recover the turtle. Somebody tipped off the local paper. The turtle, and the ashes, turned up at a Salvation Army thrift store.
NPR logo

Salvation Army Returns Cremated Ashes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12586316/12586317" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Salvation Army Returns Cremated Ashes

Salvation Army Returns Cremated Ashes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/12586316/12586317" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, proud to report that the ashes are back.

Yesterday, we told you of the woman from Elmira, New York who sold a ceramic turtle at a yard sale. She hadn't realized it contained the ashes of her husband's first wife. The customer spoke of using it as a cookie jar. But Anita Lewis got publicity for her drive to recover the turtle, and somebody tipped off the local paper. The turtle and the ashes turned up at a Salvation Army thrift store.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.