Movie Review - 'Kick Ass' - Self-Made Heroes, Kicking Ass And Talking Trash What happens when teenagers decide to become real-life superheroes? The events of Kick-Ass, perhaps. Based on a popular comic-book series, Matthew Vaughn's brutal comedy is pretty much everything an action flick should (or maybe shouldn't) be: loud, violent and very, very vulgar.
NPR logo

Self-Made Heroes 'Kick Ass' And Talk Trash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/126002361/126039918" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Self-Made Heroes 'Kick Ass' And Talk Trash

Review

Movies

Self-Made Heroes 'Kick Ass' And Talk Trash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/126002361/126039918" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And now to a movie about a teen superhero that film critic Kenneth Turan says may be toxic to some parents but is poised to become a pop culture phenomenon.

KENNETH TURAN: The sweetness comes first, as teenage protagonist Dave makes the decision to be a superhero named Kick-Ass - even though, as he himself puts it, my only superpower was being invisible to girls.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

TURAN: Kick-Ass becomes an Internet phenomenon who ends up fighting all kinds of crime, with the hooligans and the good guys mixing it up in an ultraviolent "Kill Bill" kind of way.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

TURAN: At the same time, if you're any kind of action film fan, it's difficult to deny the live-wire pulp energy of this extravaganza. It's as if the arguments about these hyperviolent action films - why are they popular, what have they done to our culture - have all opened for business in one convenient location. It may or may not be the end of civilization as we know it, but "Kick-Ass" is certainly Exhibit A of the here and now.

MONTAGNE: Kenneth Turan reviews movies for MORNING EDITION and the Los Angeles Times.

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.