A Brother Lost To The Civil Rights Struggle The Orangeburg Massacre, sparked by civil rights protests in 1968, claimed the lives of three college students. One of them was Samuel Hammond Jr. — or Bubba, as his sisters called him.
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A Brother Lost To The Civil Rights Struggle

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A Brother Lost To The Civil Rights Struggle

A Brother Lost To The Civil Rights Struggle

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Samuel Hammond, Jr. died after being shot in the back in what became known as the Orangeburg Massacre. His younger sisters, Zenobbie Clark and Diana Carter sat down for StoryCorps, recently, to talk about the brother they called Bubba.

DIANA CARTER: I just idolized him. You know, he was handsome and my friends used to like to come to the house so they could see Bubba.

ZENOBBIE CLARK: He taught me to ride a bicycle and to swim.

CARTER: Bubba dream was to be an NFL player. I remember one football game when he was at school. South Carolina State lost and Bubba was lying down on my mama's lap crying like a big ole baby, you know. And she said, look at this, look at this. You're not going to make it a whole entire season you crying after the first game. But that was her baby.

CLARK: Oh yes.

CARTER: That was her heart.

CLARK: When we got the news about my brother's death, mom, she just flipped out. And they, you know, had to sedate her.

CARTER: I was sleep and you woke me up, and you said, Diane, could you come and sleep with me? And I said, why? And you said, because Bubba is dead. And dad had to go identify the body. And I remember when he got back, he said, you know, he was okay until he had to go up to the dorm to...

CLARK: Pack his clothes.

CARTER: The pain was just so unbearable. You know, we had four cousins that went to war and all came back unscathed. Bubba went to college and Bubba came home in a box.

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INSKEEP: This conversation and the others will be archived at the Library of Congress.

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INSKEEP: This is NPR News.

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