Meet The New Guy On Air Force One President Obama took a two-day swing through the rural Midwest this week. In many ways, it was a typical domestic trip, but for NPR's Ari Shapiro, everything was new.
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Meet The New Guy On Air Force One

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Meet The New Guy On Air Force One

Meet The New Guy On Air Force One

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

President Obama took a two-day swing through the rural Midwest this week. In many ways it was a typical domestic trip. But for NPR's Ari Shapiro everything was new. He's just joined NPR's White House team and he sent us this Reporter's Notebook about his first trip with the president.

ARI SHAPIRO: Flying home to Washington, President Obama walked to the back of Air Force One and took reporters' questions. He has not done that in months. And just when it looked like he was done...

BARACK OBAMA: Okay? Thanks you, guys. One more. I'll give him the last question, since this is his first ride on the plane.

SHAPIRO: When the white-haired waitress offered to brew him a fresh pot of coffee, the president declined.

OBAMA: Unidentified Woman: (Unintelligible)

SHAPIRO: Unidentified Man: Ladies and gentlemen, the president of the United States.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

SHAPIRO: Barack the Barbarian?

BILL BURTON: I have seen that comic book. I liked it, because it had few words and lots of pictures, which made it easy to understand.

SHAPIRO: He added: When you come to Iowa, you see all sorts of fun things. I know exactly how he feels.

SIMON: NPR's Ari Shapiro.

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