Limericks Carl reads three news-related limericks, on: why you will soon meet a baby named Bella, the next thing to go 3-D, and another way to spell D-I-V-O-R-C-E.
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Limericks

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Limericks

Limericks

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PETER SAGAL, Host:

Coming up, it's "Lightning Fill in the Blank." But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924, or click the contact us link at our website, waitwait.npr.org. There, you can find out about attending our weekly live shows right here at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago. You can also check out our blog, which our commenters have called sophomoric, a threat to NPR's integrity.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And a reason to review our intern hiring process. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

M: Hi, Peter, how are you?

SAGAL: I'm fine, who's this?

M: This is David Lundy from Dallas, Georgia.

SAGAL: Dallas, Georgia.

M: Yeah.

SAGAL: Different from the other Dallas. What do you do there?

M: I am a computer programmer.

SAGAL: I see. OK. And that's exciting and interesting work.

M: Well, it depends on who you talk to, but yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, I'm talking to you. Is it exciting and interesting work?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: I am absolutely rapt on a daily basis, yeah.

SAGAL: I understand. OK. Well, welcome to our show, David. Carl Kasell is going to read you three news-related limericks with the last word or phrase missing from each of them. If you can fill in that last word or phrase correctly on two of the limericks, you'll be a winner. Ready to go?

M: I'm ready.

SAGAL: Here is your first limerick.

M: As mother, the kid's name is my right, and Cullen sounds great dear, so why fight? The vampire novellas have Jacob and Bella. Let's name kids for figures from...

M: "Twilights."

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Last year's kindergarteners were all named Harry and Hermione. Next year, they will be named for angsty vampires. According to the Social Security Administration's annual list of most popular baby names, parents are naming their kids after the characters in "Twilight." Isabella and Jacob are topping the list, and Cullen - that's the last name of the lead vampire - jumped 300 spots in the last couple of years.

We're just imagining a couple of years from now, these kids picking sides for kickball. Kids are like, I'll take Cullen, Count Chocula and Nosforatu. No, no, not you. I meant Nosforatu Goldstein.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: This is not new at all.

SAGAL: No.

M: I mean, it's new because it is "Twilight," but my Uncle Huckleberry...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I didn't fall for that, I went for the classic names. I have my daughter, C-3P0...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Yoda and Kirk.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right, here is your next limerick.

KASELL: They pop right out, they do not stay coy, girls jump off the page and display joy. Our mag is not drab, but ready to grab, it's 3-D for pictures in...

M: Playboy.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Right, exactly. Playboy is the answer.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Making boobs appear more realistic has never been the goal at Playboy magazine, but Hugh Hefner has spotted a trend in Hollywood and he is going to get onboard. When asked about his plan for 3-D centerfolds, he said, quote: What would people most like to see in 3-D? Probably a naked lady, unquote. Of course, probably a naked lady is Hef's answer to pretty much every question.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: At Boston Market - Mr. Hefner, would you like any sides? Probably a naked lady.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Sir, has anyone else handled your baggage? You know...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right, here is your last limerick.

KASELL: My marriage once on a firm base shook, because I said my ex has a new place, look. I got social on line, now I'm not doing fine. I'm divorced because I spent time on...

M: Facebook.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: According to legal experts, one in five divorce petitions these days cite Facebook as a cause.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: Wow.

SAGAL: This is true. One in five, they claim the social networking site acts as a springboard for licentious behavior, enabling husbands and wives to reconnect with past lovers, who after a few years of marriage suddenly seem a lot less crazy.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It doesn't really even have to be somebody you dated. It's late at night, you're cruising Facebook and you start thinking, hey, it's Bobby from kindergarten, I wonder if he still eats paste?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Carl, how did David do our quiz?

KASELL: Very well, Peter, three correct answers. So David, you win our prize.

SAGAL: Well done. Congratulations.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

M: Woo-hoo.

SAGAL: Thanks so much for playing.

M: All right, thanks for having me.

SAGAL: Bye-bye.

M: Bye-bye.

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