Sports Fan's Dilemma: Trusting An Athlete Today Doping accusations leveled at Lance Armstrong by his former teammate Floyd Landis bring to mind the unpopular, but candid, Jose Canseco. Unfortunately, in cycling and other sports, today's athletes are guilty until proven innocent.
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Sports Fan's Dilemma: Trusting An Athlete Today

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Sports Fan's Dilemma: Trusting An Athlete Today

Sports Fan's Dilemma: Trusting An Athlete Today

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Now to commentator Frank Deford, who says it's hard to find any sport at all - any sport these days that doesn't have athletes accused of taking performance- enhancing drugs.

FRANK DEFORD: Excuse me, there are no good, licensed doctors in Florida? I'm sorry, it's just so difficult any longer to believe any athlete about drugs. Too many of them have lied and lied and lied, until they were proved to be lying. Oh, I know they're all innocent until proven guilty. It's just that by now, I'm afraid that I think sport - all sport - is guilty until proven innocent.

MONTAGNE: This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

And I'm David Greene.

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