Obama Gulf During a visit to Louisiana on Friday, President Obama continued to indicate his frustration with oil giant BP. While some progress has been made in fighting the oil spill, he said, it's still "way to early to be optimistic." NPR's Scott Horsley, who is travelling with the president, reports.
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Obama Gulf

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Obama Gulf

Obama Gulf

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama was back on the Gulf Coast today meeting with fishermen and business owners whose livelihoods are threatened by the BP oil spill. He warned the oil company not to nickel and dime those who file damage claims.

NPR's Scott Horsley travel to Louisiana with the president and has this report.

SCOTT HORSLEY: This is President Obama's third trip to the Gulf Coast since the deepwater drilling rig exploded, touching off America's worst oil spill. He says the visits have been helpful in cutting through red tape and getting cleanup supplies where they're needed. The residents here have grown weary as the days go by and the damage grows.

Mr. Obama had some tough words about BP's obligation to pay for that damage sooner rather than later. He noted the oil company is already spending millions of dollars on TV ads to burnish his image and could pay out billions in dividends with shareholders.

President BARACK OBAMA: I don't have a problem with BP fulfilling its legal obligations. But I want BP to be very clear, they've got moral and legal obligations here at the Gulf for the damage that has been done.

HORSLEY: Mr. Obama met with Gulf Coast governors and Louisiana parish presidents in New Orleans. Asked about concerns that his six-month moratorium on deepwater drilling could cost jobs in Louisiana, Mr. Obama says he's unwilling to cut corners, but is open to suggestions on how drilling might resume more quickly if it can be done safely.

Scott Horsley, NPR News, with the president in Grand Isle, Louisiana.

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