Master Of Ceremonies Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase in which the first word ends in the letter M and the second word starts with C. For example, given "Lysol or Comet product," the answer would be "bathroom cleaner."
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Master Of Ceremonies

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Master Of Ceremonies

Master Of Ceremonies

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Liane Hansen.

And joining us is puzzle master Will Shortz. Hey, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Liane. You getting ready for beach time?

HANSEN: Oh, you know I always am. I think I'm going to try and sneak out after the show for my weekend this weekend. It's that time of year, isn't it? Right.

SHORTZ: Yeah, yeah.

HANSEN: I love it and I love it that I have lots of crossword puzzles down at the beach in case I, you know, need a little bit of brain food.

SHORTZ: Nice.

HANSEN: 'Cause Lord knows the fudge doesn't do that for me.

You gave us a challenge last week, which we haven't had one of these in the while, the spoonerism. Repeat that challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. It came from listener Al Gorey of Cozy Lake, New Jersey. And it did involve spoonerisms where you interchange the initial consonant sounds of two words to get two new words. For example, if you spoonerize right lane, you get light rain.

And I asked you to take a familiar two-word phrase, an instruction seen on many containers, spoonerize it and you'll name two things seen at the beach. What are they?

HANSEN: And your answer?

SHORTZ: The answer is: the instruction is shake well, and if you spoonerize that you get wake and shell, and those are two things you might see at the beach.

HANSEN: I do all the time. Well, we received more than 2,000 entries this week. Our winner is Amber Cartwright from Cincinnati, Ohio, but we are reaching her in Las Vegas, Nevada. Hi, Amber.

Ms. AMBER CARTWRIGHT: Hi, Liane.

HANSEN: What are you doing in Las Vegas?

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: I am attending the World Tea Expo, which starts today.

HANSEN: Now, what do you in Cincinnati that allows you to go to a tea expo in Las Vegas?

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: I work for a flavor company and one of the product lines I support is tea and I'm here to learn more about it and just the general global trends and the health and wellness around it.

HANSEN: You sound ready to play. Are you ready?

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: I sure am.

HANSEN: All right. Well, Will, meet Amber; Amber, meet Will. Let's play.

SHORTZ: Hi, Amber. Well, today's puzzle is called master of ceremonies. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase in which the first word ends in the letter M and the second word stars with C. For example, if I said Lysol or Comet product, you would say bathroom cleaner. All right. Number one is: it might wake you up in the morning.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Alarm clock.

SHORTZ: That's right. Number two is: Manhattan or New England food item.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Clam chowder.

SHORTZ: That's it. How about part of a s'more.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Could you say that again?

SHORTZ: Part of a s'more.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Graham cracker.

HANSEN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Graham cracker is it. A constant brat.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Child.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. What kind.

HANSEN: This was the title of a movie, I think?

SHORTZ: Yes.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Problem child.

HANSEN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Problem child is it. Below ground shelter during a tornado.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: A storm cellar.

SHORTZ: That's it. A Hoover product.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Vacuum cleaner.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. P.E.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Gym class.

HANSEN: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Good. Title for a woman who heads a meeting.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: For a woman who heads a meeting?

SHORTZ: Uh-huh.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: I'm drawing a blank.

HANSEN: Would you say Madame Chair?

SHORTZ: Madame Chair, Madame Chairman, yeah. Good job. How about a cocktail made with gin and lemon juice. And it's the name of a person.

HANSEN: I don't get to the bars much anymore.

SHORTZ: You don't out to bars, yeah. I'll tell you that. It's a Tom Collins.

HANSEN: Oh right, okay.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Oh.

HANSEN: All right.

SHORTZ: All right. Try this: what's seen after a nuclear test.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Storm cloud?

SHORTZ: Cloud is right but a nuclear test.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Oh, a nuclear test. A mushroom cloud.

SHORTZ: Mushroom cloud is it. How about spread for a bagel?

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Cream cheese.

SHORTZ: That's it. Place in the house to keep a mop.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Cellar, closet.

SHORTZ: Uh-huh. What kind?

HANSEN: A broom.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Yeah.

SHORTZ: A broom closet is it. And your last one: table salt, chemically.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Sodium chloride.

SHORTZ: Sodium chloride. So fast. Nice job.

HANSEN: Thank you, Amber. Thank you, thank you, thank you. Periodic table - not there, not there. We have a swell person to tell you what you're going to take away for playing the puzzle today. He's a legendary musician and one of my personal guitar heroes, Jeff Beck.

Mr. JEFF BECK (Musician): For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, the Scrabble Deluxe Edition from Parker Brothers, the book series, Will Shortz Presents Ken-Ken, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 from St. Martin's Press, one Will Shortz Puzzle Master Decks of Riddles and Challenges from Chronicle Books and a CD compilation of NPR's Sunday puzzles.

HANSEN: Amber, you added a little squeal before we began to hear Jeff Beck. I take it you know who he is.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: I do, of course.

HANSEN: Will, I bet that was a thrill for you too knowing him.

SHORTZ: That is fantastic, yeah.

HANSEN: Isn't that great? Yeah. But he's come a long way from the Yardbirds. So, people will hear it later on in the program. Before we let you go, Amber, and I mean, we do know we're getting you in Las Vegas, but what member station do you listen to in Ohio?

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: I listen to WVXU at 91.7 and I'm a member.

HANSEN: All right, Amber Cartwright from Cincinnati, Ohio, you were fabulous. Thanks a lot for playing with us today.

Ms. CARTWRIGHT: Thank you.

HANSEN: All right, Will, we need another challenge for next week. What have you got?

SHORTZ: Yes. Write down these five names: Christian Dior, Anne Boleyn, Edna Ferber, Indiana Jones and Richard Simmons. The first four names have something very unusual in common that the fifth name does not. What is it? And I'll give you a hint: Its a property that only a few names have. To show that you have the right answer, think of another name that shares the same property. And any name that shares the property will be considered correct.

So again, Christian Dior, Anne Boleyn, Edna Ferber, Indiana Jones and Richard Simmons. The first four names have something very unusual in common that the fifth name doesn't. What property is it? And think of another name that shares this.

HANSEN: Oh. All right, when you have the answer, no matter how long it takes, go to our website, NPR.org/puzzle and click on the Submit Your Answer link. Only one entry per person, please. Our deadline is Thursday, 3 P.M. Eastern Time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. We'll call you if youre the winner, and you'll get to play puzzle on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Will, thanks a lot.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Liane.

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