Panel Round Two More questions for the panel: Desperately Seeking Osama, and BP can't stop the flow of fail.

Panel Round Two

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CARL KASELL, Host:

From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR news quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Adam Felber, Kyrie O'Connor, and Mo Rocca. And here again is your host, at the State Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Peter Sagal.

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PETER SAGAL, Host:

Thank you so much, Carl. Thank you everybody. Woot woot, here we are. We're back. And in just a minute, inspired by all this talk of adventuring, Carl mounts an expedition to climb Mt. Kilirhymjaro...

KYRIE O: Ooh.

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SAGAL: ...in our listener limerick challenge.

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SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait Wait. That's 1-888- 924-8924.

But right now, panel, some more questions for you from the weeks news. Mo, Mark Kirk, is a congressman. He's now running for President Obama's old senate seat in Illinois. He's run into trouble over statements he's made about his military and even his teaching experience that have turned out not to be true.

This week, though, he hit upon a successful strategy for dealing with tough questions from the press. What did he do?

MO ROCCA: Oh, he had his voice box removed?

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SAGAL: That'll show him.

ROCCA: What did he do? He pretended, tough questions, he now speaks a new language.

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ROCCA: I don't know, what could he do?

SAGAL: Well, he got this idea during a screening of the classical movie "Chariots of Fire."

ROCCA: Oh, he just runs away now.

SAGAL: He ran away, yes.

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SAGAL: That's his tactic.

ADAM FELBER: In slow motion.

ROCCA: Yeah.

SAGAL: After Mark Kirk claimed military honors and missions he didn't actually earn or do, the New York Times revealed that he also lied about, of all things, being a nursery school teacher.

ROCCA: Yeah.

SAGAL: So reporters were waiting for him after a speech in downtown Chicago. He gets off the stage, he sees the reporters, they start shouting questions and he turns and he runs.

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SAGAL: And they chased him, and they continue to shout their questions and he keeps running, through the kitchen, into an SUV which peeled out.

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FELBER: Oh, my God.

ROCCA: Oh, so he had it set up as a get away car too.

SAGAL: Yes, yes he did.

ROCCA: He knew he was sprinting.

FELBER: And the helicopters, right and did all the cable news channels switch to this sound.

SAGAL: They did. With like a chase through the streets of Chicago.

FELBER: The reporter should have seen it coming, he was wearing shorts.

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SAGAL: Spikes.

FELBER: Yeah.

SAGAL: Kirk.

ROCCA: Stretching during his...

SAGAL: Exactly, limbering up.

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SAGAL: Kirk, though being Kirk then claimed he had won a gold medal in the Olympic 100 meter sprint.

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SAGAL: Adam, listen to this description from Carl.

KASELL: If it's an Italian, he will roll over three or four times. The Russians, they will go down with a thud and lay there spread eagled, looking to the sky. The French will look up with innocent anguish. The English are more sturdy about it.

SAGAL: Carl was describing the various international techniques of doing what?

FELBER: Feigning injury in the World Cup.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

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SAGAL: Diving.

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FELBER: Boy, that's annoying.

SAGAL: Yes.

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FELBER: No one is better than the Italians at that.

SAGAL: Oh well, you think. Carl was quoting on Frank Delaney, he's an author and soccer fan. He was speaking on Weekend Edition. Mr. Delaney was describing the various ways soccer players hit the turf overacting like it's a high school production of "Our Town"...

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SAGAL: ...in an effort to draw penalty against their opponent. The Italians, as you say, are claimed as some of the most theatrical divers. They were eliminated Thursday. That's good, they can now focus on their acting careers.

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SAGAL: Alessandro Nesta, for example, has achieved fame for his one man show, "Ow, You Almost Touched Me."

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FELBER: He also did that great "Give Me a Minute and I'll Decide What Part Is Hurt."

SAGAL: Yes, he can do that.

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SAGAL: What I love is that I've, its true and when they work, when they draw penalty against the other guy, and they get a penalty kick. They get up and they forget to limp.

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ROCCA: Right.

SAGAL: You know some guy will be lying there; oh, he gouged out my eyes. You know screaming and they give the yellow card to the guy, and he pops up and he sort of happily walks back and kicks the ball.

ROCCA: Well, European health care is very good.

SAGAL: Exactly.

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ROCCA: Right on there, right on the spot.

FELBER: I was murdered I tell you. Murdered, got better.

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SAGAL: Mo, BP has had a lot of terrible press lately, because they are terrible. But one journalist is doing some enterprise reporting about how the gulf oil disaster is in fact a boon for business there. Who does this journalist work for?

ROCCA: Well, I mean, it's obviously, I mean it's going to be - it's BP.

SAGAL: Yes, it's BP.

ROCCA: Yeah.

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SAGAL: The article appears in the magazine "Planet BP," published by BP.

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SAGAL: Quote, "The region's businesses, particularly the hotels have been prospering because so many people have come here from BP and other oil emergency response teams."

ROCCA: They should change the name of that magazine, quick.

SAGAL: Yeah.

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ROCCA: We cover everything.

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