Limericks Carl reads three news-related limericks, on: high art; why it's an iPhone, not a wePhone; and a new TV demo.

Limericks

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PETER SAGAL, Host:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait Wait. That's 1-888-924-8924. Or you can click the contact us link on our website, waitwait.npr.org. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

MATT SILBERNAGEL: Hi, this is Matt Silbernagel from Sun Prairie, Wisconsin.

SAGAL: Sun Prairie, Wisconsin.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SILBERNAGEL: Indeed.

SAGAL: And do you feel a rivalry with Minnesota being from Wisconsin?

SILBERNAGEL: Well, I was a Vikings fan.

SAGAL: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SILBERNAGEL: And then Brett Favre became Green Bay, and I became a Packers fan.

SAGAL: Yeah.

SILBERNAGEL: And then Brett Far went to Minnesota, and now I'm just confused.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I can imagine. Well, welcome to our show, Matt. Carl Kasell is now going to read you three news related limericks, with the last word or phrase missing from each. If you can fill in that last word or phrase correctly on two of the limericks, you'll be a winner. Ready to play?

SILBERNAGEL: I'm nervous but ready.

SAGAL: All right, here is your first limerick.

CARL KASELL, Host:

California is broke, as a state, so new income we try to create. Soon DMV tags have room for some ads; we'll make billboards of your license...

SILBERNAGEL: Plate.

SAGAL: Right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: The increasingly desperate lawmakers in bankrupt California are considering a bill allowing for electronic license plates. They'd flash between, you know, standard identifying numbers and letters in ads, you know, they're like those new electronic billboards. It would bring in revenue, but think of what it might do police chases.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's like, 1-Adam-12, we're in pursuit of a white van, license plate E68, if it lasts more than four hours call your doctor F6.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

ADAM FELBER: I would be distracted by that. That would completely distract me from my texting.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Here is your next limerick.

KASELL: Most meetings I go to aren't so hot, they require some nodding, but no thought. A machine with a face could go take my place, I'll stay home and send in a...

SILBERNAGEL: Robot.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: A robot. Are you tired of wasting your time in meetings? Wouldn't you rather spend your time watching lol cat videos, or reading about your new favorite sport, soccer?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: A Japanese company, Innovation Matrix, has developed a robot surrogate to attend business meetings in your place. It's got cameras microphones, so it can speak and see for you. It's amazing how closely this man sized robot approximates human behavior. For example, just this week, one of these robot surrogates was reprimanded for sexually harassing the fax machine.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MO ROCCA: A fax, wow, faxes are so old.

CONNOR: Yeah.

ROCCA: That would be like harassment and elder abuse.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: What can I say, I had a thing for older technology.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Harassing my Tel-X.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FELBER: It was seen talking up a selectric.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I don't think you're obsolete.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Anyway.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right, very good. Here is your last limerick.

KASELL: With fringes and hair curls, who knew, I'm arrested because I had no clue. I saw a prayer shawl and then started a brawl, I was duped because he looked like a ...

SILBERNAGEL: Rhymes with a zoo?

SAGAL: No.

SILBERNAGEL: Stew?

SAGAL: No. It's a tough one. I will give it to you, because I think you've already won. It's a Jew. He's duped because he looks like a Jew. The mayor of Amsterdam's plan to clean up the streets of Amsterdam is mishugina, mishugina like a fox.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They have been having trouble with anti-Semitic gangs, right? So police officers are going to be trained to become decoy Jews. They'll learn to complain colorfully about trivial annoyances.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And to loudly worry that their children may not choose to become physicians.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So these thugs will be lured out and then the decoy Jews transform and let them have it, yamulkes turn into razor sharp flying discs, ka-zing.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The main challenge so far has been casting convincing decoy Jews. You know, for example, Samuel L. Jackson a great actor but no one really bought his "I've had it with these misagoshing snakes on this facacta plane."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

FELBER: You know, what would be funny, would be the school where they all learn that...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FELBER: ...to listen to an entire class of policemen...

SAGAL: Yes.

ROCCA: ...taking the instruction there.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's like, everybody together, yes, I'm watching my salt.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Do you have to put me right next to the air conditioner?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Anyway, Carl, how did Matt do on our quiz?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

KASELL: Matt did well enough, Peter. He had two correct answers. So, Matt, you win our prize.

SAGAL: Well done.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Congratulations.

SILBERNAGEL: Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

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