Amazing Photo Captures Double Lightning Strike Lightning struck Chicago this week. Tornadoes were in the forecast Wednesday night, and Chicago Tribune photographer Chris Sweda rushed up to the top floor of the John Hancock building and snapped his shutter just as two bolts of lightning simultaneously zapped the spires of both the Willis Tower and the new Trump Tower.
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Amazing Photo Captures Double Lightning Strike

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Amazing Photo Captures Double Lightning Strike

Amazing Photo Captures Double Lightning Strike

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(Soundbite of thunder)

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Lightning struck Chicago this week. Tornados were in the forecast Wednesday night, and Chicago Tribune photographer Chris Sweda rushed up to the top floor of the John Hancock Building and snapped his shutter just as two bolts of lightning simultaneously zapped the spires of both Willis Tower and the new Trump Tower.

His photo is sensational: A pair of lightning bolts throwing stage-lights into the skyline.

No doubt those two great lightning bolts were caused by an atmospheric discharge of electricity inside the thunderstorm. Wednesday was also the day that a jury heard audio of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich muse with an aide that as governor of President Obama's home state, the U.S. Senate seat it was in his power to appoint just might convince the president to name Governor Blagojevich ambassador to India.

Maybe that's why lightning struck.

As Chris Sweda's photo was zapped around the world, many people wondered if it had been some kind of computer-concocted spectacle. The Tribune convincingly explained it was truly the providence of putting a gifted photographer in the right place at the right time.

You can find a link to the photo on our website, npr.org, and be reminded that in dark and thunder miracles sometimes light up the night.

(Soundbite of song, "Riders on the Storm")

SIMON: Youre listening to NPR News.

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