Fans Unfazed By New Armstrong Doping Allegations In interviews with federal investigators, disgraced cyclist Floyd Landis painted a damning picture of doping on the U.S. Postal team and said Lance Armstrong (above, center) was an integral part of it. Despite the allegations, Armstrong's supporters and even some critics credit him with ushering in a new era of pro cycling and bringing glamour to the Tour.
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Fans Unfazed By New Armstrong Doping Allegations

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Fans Unfazed By New Armstrong Doping Allegations

Fans Unfazed By New Armstrong Doping Allegations

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ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

Unidentified Man: (French spoken)

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY: Damien Ressiot writes about sport drug use for French newspaper L'Equipe.

DAMIEN RESSIOT: (Through Translator) If I were Armstrong, I'd be worried because it's no longer sports authorities looking into this. These are federal agents doing the investigation. And there seems to be a real will in the U.S. to crack doping cases these days.

BEARDSLEY: That doesn't mean anything, says Ressiot.

RESSIOT: (Through Translator) Marion Jones was tested 160 times and came up negative every time. And as it turns out, she doped her entire career. You can dope and never be caught. You just have to have the right products, money and be very careful.

BEARDSLEY: Armstrong has dismissed Landis' charges, saying nothing the disgraced cyclist says can be believed. And the cloud of allegations hanging over him seems to have little effect on his popularity with fans at the Tour de France.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

BEARDSLEY: French fan Jocelyn Bouvier and his friends say they will always admire Armstrong for the way he overcame cancer.

JOCELYN BOUVIER: Unidentified Man #2: (French language spoken)

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

BEARDSLEY: Pierre Callewart, a cycling correspondent with L'Equipe, says in his 13 appearances, Armstrong has changed the Tour de France.

PIERRE CALLEWART: When he started to study the road and preview the stages, 10 or 12 years ago, no one was doing that and now everyone is doing it. They like his way of riding, his way of preparing, his work ethics.

BEARDSLEY: For NPR News, I'm Eleanor Beardsley in Paris.

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