Letters: Tea Party, Companies' Cash Reserves Michele Norris and Robert Siegel read from listener emails about a story on the Tea Party's belief that the Obama administration and Democrats are subverting the Constitution and an interview with Steven Pearlstein about how companies are sitting on cash reserves.
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Letters: Tea Party, Companies' Cash Reserves

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Letters: Tea Party, Companies' Cash Reserves

Letters: Tea Party, Companies' Cash Reserves

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Some of your letters about yesterday's program in a minute, but first, we made a mistake.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Yesterday, we read a listener comment about director Roman Polanski and attributed that comment to one Mike Vendel(ph) of Chicago. Well, Mr. Vendel wrote back to us, saying that wasn't his letter. Not a big deal, he says, but hopefully, it was a slight mistake and not a more systematic error.

NORRIS: Well, by way of explanation, this was a human error: Plain and simple, we mixed up the names. The comments actually belong to Joanne Marbut of Ypsilanti, Michigan, who also alerted us to our error. Ms. Marbut and Mr. Vendel, we apologize, and we thank you for listening and for correcting us.

SIEGEL: And now your letters about yesterday's program. Many of you wrote about our story on Tea Party supporters and their belief that the Obama administration and the Democratic Congress are subverting the Constitution.

Well, Peter Lury(ph) of Richmond, Virginia, writes: One interviewee proudly proclaimed she does not study this hallowed document, but it's hard to understand why she claims the Obama administration is eviscerating the Constitution when it's not clear that the small copy she keeps in her purse has ever been read, much less understood.

NORRIS: And David Steigerwald(ph) of Columbus, Ohio, had this to say: I'm struck by the similarities between the Tea Party's concept of the Constitution and the way fundamentalists treat the Bible. Each is considered a sacred text, handed down from God through a handful of prophets and treated as immutable and inviolable. And yet, in both cases, the texts are read very selectively. Bits and pieces are plucked out, always without context, to defend a rigid political position. I'd wager the two groups overlap a lot in membership, as well as mentality.

SIEGEL: Well, keep your comments coming. You can write to us at npr.org. Just click on contact us at the bottom of the page.

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