Movie Review - 'Salt' - Angelina Jolie, Providing A Little Spice Critic Kenneth Turan says the actress's steely resolve -- in a kicking-butt-and-taking-names part originally written for a male star -- is the main reason to see a summer action thriller that otherwise gets pretty silly, pretty fast.
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Who Is 'Salt'? Tastily Enough, It's Angelina Jolie

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Who Is 'Salt'? Tastily Enough, It's Angelina Jolie

Review

Movies

Who Is 'Salt'? Tastily Enough, It's Angelina Jolie

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

There are two strong female characters taking the lead in big movies opening this weekend. We begin with CIA hotshot Evelyn Salt, played by Angelina Jolie. Critic Kenneth Turan says that Jolie is the seasoning that makes "Salt" worth seeing.

KENNETH TURAN: Angelina Jolie stars as a tough-as-nails CIA agent named Evelyn Salt who gets the surprise of her life when she has to interview a Russian defector.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SALT")

S: (as character) The name of the Russian agent is Salt, Evelyn Salt.

ANGELINA JOLIE: Unidentified Man #1: (as character) Then you are a Russian spy.

TURAN: Unidentified Man #3 (Actor): (as character) Last chance.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SALT")

JOLIE: Unidentified Man #4 (Actor): (as character) Don't make me put you down.

TURAN: This film's plot of secret Russian agents planted deep in U.S. soil gets increasingly preposterous - despite its echo of recent events. What saves the movie from total silliness is star Jolie's fierce commitment to action, and the way she projects ice-cold fury.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "SALT")

JOLIE: (as Evelyn Salt) No, I didn't do anything.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNFIRE)

TURAN: "Salt" is set up, as most films seem to be these days, with a sequel in mind. Personally, I hope they call it "Salt II." That would make it the first Hollywood blockbuster to be named after a real-life nuclear arms reduction treaty. Now that would be something to look forward to.

MONTAGNE: Kenneth Turan reviews movies for MORNING EDITION and the Los Angeles Times.

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