Letters: Stretching A Food Budget; Old Spice Robert Siegel and Michele Norris read listener letters about our story on one family's struggle to stretch its food budget, and on the Old Spice Guy.
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Letters: Stretching A Food Budget; Old Spice

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Letters: Stretching A Food Budget; Old Spice

Letters: Stretching A Food Budget; Old Spice

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Here's some of what we've got in our inbox. Our story about the struggle of one Pennsylvania family to stretch its food budget had many of you shaking your heads in disbelief.

Celistan Web(ph) of Perry, Georgia, says: The thing that is missing in this family you interviewed is cooking. Web says she feeds her family of six on $500 a month and writes: We don't buy corn dogs or empty-calorie tea. We drink water and make soups for lunch with a few basic ingredients or sandwiches and a salad.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And Janet Lorenz(ph) of Philadelphia writes that she didn't think food was the family's big problem, given that the father is a high school dropout and his pregnant 18-year-old daughter doesn't have a high school diploma.

Lorenz writes: We have to start tying government assistance to personal incentives for education, nutrition and health. If you get assistance, you must achieve goals. How else will we ever disengage this grip of generational poverty and ignorance?

NORRIS: Now on a lighter note.

Unidentified Man: Hello listeners.

NORRIS: Yesterday, we discussed Old Spice's popular YouTube marketing campaign. The brand invited the public to ask its smooth-voiced, freshly-showered pitchman questions. Some, he answered.

Unidentified Man: How many teeth do sharks have? Well my dearest Rose(ph), it's funny you should ask because I spent my younger years as an apprentice in a shark dentistry practice on a distant island. So I can tell you, the answer to your query is 3,000.

SIEGEL: Well, most of you were not amused, including Carolyn Lorry(ph) of Greenwood, Indiana. She writes this: My father wore Old Spice aftershave and I loved how he smelled. To me, Old Spice was a gentleman's scent, which is a direct contrast to the obnoxious and arrogant Old Spice man in the TV commercials. The ads turn me off completely, I'm sorry to say, because they spoil the image of the warm and gentle man who smelled so good.

NORRIS: Well, our inbox is always open. So please keep the emails coming. You can send them to us at npr.org. Just click on contact us at the bottom of the page.

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