Swimmer Becomes Slowest To Cross Channel A swimmer has broken a record that has stood since 1923, becoming the slowest person to swim the English Channel. Jackie Cobell took nearly 29 hours to cross the Channel after strong tides repeatedly pushed her off-course. Normally, the route is 21 miles, but Cobell ended up swimming 65 miles. Now she's thinking of making the Alcatraz swim. She told the BBC: "They've got sharks, so it might make me go a bit quicker!"
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Swimmer Becomes Slowest To Cross Channel

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Swimmer Becomes Slowest To Cross Channel

Swimmer Becomes Slowest To Cross Channel

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

A swimmer has broken a record that stood since 1923, becoming the slowest person to swim the English Channel. Jackie Cobell took nearly 29 hours to cross the Channel after strong tides repeatedly pushed her off-course. Normally, the route is 21 miles, but Cobell ended up swimming 65. Now she's thinking of making the Alcatraz swim. She told the BBC: They've got sharks, so it might make me go a bit quicker.

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