Letters: Dodging Questions, Police Cuts Among listeners' concerns this week: Why a government official talked around a question about privacy, and a police officer's wife says people are nervous they won't be protected as rural communities cut police budgets.
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Letters: Dodging Questions, Police Cuts

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Letters: Dodging Questions, Police Cuts

Letters: Dodging Questions, Police Cuts

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Last week, I spoke with David McClure from the Office of Citizen Services and Communications at the General Services Administration. The agency recently unveiled a redesign of its website, USA.gov, and the site's app store.

HANSEN: Our story on how the tough economy is hurting police departments in rural communities and small towns generated many responses at NPR.org.

HANSEN: We also heard from many of you regarding our story on human trafficking in the U.S., which profiled one woman who came from east Africa and worked almost 100 hours a week for only $70 a month.

HANSEN: Why did these people do this to me? It really make me sad when I remember this story.

HANSEN: Write to us. Visit our website, NPR.org, and click on the Contact Us link. You can also reach out to us on Facebook at Facebook.com/NPRWeekend or follow us on Twitter at NPRWeekend or NPRLiane - that's spelled L-I-A-N-E.

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