Facebook Sues Illinois Company Over Name Facebook has its lawyers on the offensive chasing down companies with names that end in the word "book." The social networking site forced an upstart called Placebook to change its name. Now it's suing a company called Teachbook, a Web community for teachers.
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Facebook Sues Illinois Company Over Name

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Facebook Sues Illinois Company Over Name

Facebook Sues Illinois Company Over Name

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Our last word in business is face-off.

Facebook has its lawyers on the offensive. They're chasing down companies with names that end in the word book. The social networking site has forced an upstart called Placebook to change its name. Now it's suing a company called Teachbook, a Web community for teachers. And it's not just the word book; Facebook also wants the word face.

According to the tech blog TechCrunch, Facebook is trying to trademark the word but it is facing resistance from a company that owns a mobile phone payment system called FaceCash. And dont forget about FaceTime. That's the video calling service owned by another big company with a lot of lawyers, Apple.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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