Eat Your Way Down I-95, And Other Stops To Make In their seven-year love affair with Interstate 95, Stan Posner and Sandra Phillips-Posner have found the best Polish sausage, Berger cookies and a battleship you can spend the night on.
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Eat Your Way Down I-95, And Other Stops To Make

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Eat Your Way Down I-95, And Other Stops To Make

Eat Your Way Down I-95, And Other Stops To Make

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

Anyone who's been caught in traffic on I-95 - any other interstate, for that matter - may think that our next guests may have breathed in too much car exhaust. Stan Posner and Sandra Phillips-Posner don't drive along I-95 because they have to. They do it - over and over again - because they like to. Along the way they've learned everything you may need to know, and much that you probably don't care to know at all about I-95. They're authors of the book "Drive I-95: Exit by Exit Info, Maps, History and Trivia."

They join us from the studios of the CBC in Montreal. Thanks so much for being with us.

Ms. SANDRA PHILLIPS-POSNER (Author): You're welcome.

Mr. STAN POSNER (Author): You're welcome.

SIMON: So, how long have you been I-95 road warriors?

Mr. POSNER: Seven years now.

SIMON: And why? What's so fascinating?

Ms. PHILLIPS-POSNER: People don't realize how much fun they could have every day. They think they get in their car and they have this, oh, we've got to make it there after so many hours. How are we ever going to do this? And what we tell them is you're going to take a break every day. So take a break where you can enjoy it and have something to look forward to every day.

SIMON: What about road food?

Ms. PHILLIPS-POSNER: Yum.

SIMON: Well, give us some particulars, specifics if you could.

Ms. PHILLIPS-POSNER: There are so many family restaurants - and we're talking right on exits. We only go about...

Mr. POSNER: We go, like, half a mile to a mile off of the exits on each side.

Ms. PHILLIPS-POSNER: Like, to the second traffic light, so no one's going to get lost.

SIMON: Can you tell us a couple?

Ms. PHILLIPS-POSNER: Yeah. I'm going to mention in - I'm thinking of Florence, South Carolina, where we stop in for that potato soup and the toast - what is it - a croissant with a...

Mr. POSNER: With honey on it.

Ms. POSNER: Honey on it.

Mr. POSNER: It's called Percy and Willie's.

Ms. POSNER: Okay?

Mr. POSNER: And it's right on the exit.

Ms. POSNER: Wait, one second. Our favorite, the bottom of the New Jersey Turnpike, guys, we have a favorite Italian restaurant.

Mr. POSNER: Yeah, it's called Italia. It's right on Exit 3 on the Turnpike.

Ms. POSNER: And we love the calzone there. It's filed with this goo. We like the one that has the gooey cheeses and fresh ham. And they make this fabulous marinara sauce that you pour all over it.

Mr. POSNER: It's a family recipe that they have not divulged to us yet.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIMON: I must say I dont even have a driver's license, and youve finally said a series of things that make me think maybe I should get one.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. POSNER: There's actually one very close to you - the bottom of Baltimore, Exit 50. It's called Polock Johnny's.

Ms. POSNER: Did you ever eat there?

SIMON: What's that? No. Whats the name of it again?

Mr. POSNER: It's Polock Johnny's.

Ms. POSNER: And...

SIMON: A word that I would never use on the air, but there you go.

Ms. POSNER: Right, exactly. And there's this great Polish sausage with a sauce on it called The Works. Im not quite sure whats in it - a little bit of relish, a little of mustard, a little bit of...

Mr. POSNER: Onions.

Ms. POSNER: ...onions in it. Stan, your burger cookies.

Mr. POSNER: Oh, yes. There are these cookies that are available only in the immediate Baltimore area. They're called Burger Cookies.

SIMON: Oh-oh.

Mr. POSNER: You get them in the supermarkets around there.

Ms. POSNER: (Unintelligible)

SIMON: What are they, hamburger cookies?

Mr. POSNER: No.

Mr. POSNER: Burger...

Ms. POSNER: It's like a big fat - do you know what a Black and White looks like?

SIMON: Yeah.

Ms. POSNER: It's a kind of a shortbread cookie.

Mr. POSNER: But it's a Black and White thats a thick layer of chocolate fudge icing on top of this white cookie.

Ms. POSNER: Also, in Delaware, there's something called the Thanksgiving Dinner on a Bun at Capriotti's,

Mr. POSNER: And they sell it all year around.

SIMON: Hmm.

Mr. POSNER: We could go on for an hour talking about food.

SIMON: Im - Im - yes. So is there anything else we should know about I-95 that would knock our driving shoes off?

Ms. POSNER: Yes. You can go swimming with sharks, if you would like. You could...

SIMON: I dont think I would but where would you do that?

Ms. POSNER: In Camden, New Jersey at the aquarium.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. POSNER: But who would think that that would...

SIMON: I've been to Camden, and believe you me, I never thought an aquatic holiday was on order.

Mr. POSNER: Thats right, on the water facing Philly.

SIMON: Yeah.

Mr. POSNER: And right next to it is a battleship called the Battleship New Jersey, which is amazing to tour because it was in every single...

Mr. POSNER: Every major battle.

Mr. POSNER: ...battle this century.

SIMON: I've done that, actually.

Mr. POSNER: But did you know...

SIMON: Quite moving, yeah.

SIMON: Yeah.

Ms. POSNER: ...Friday and Saturday night you could sleep over on it.

SIMON: No.

Ms. POSNER: So youve got kids in the car and you say, you know, if you be good we're going to be sleeping on a battleship tonight.

SIMON: That sounds like something worth doing.

Ms. POSNER: In Connecticut, there's a garbage museum which is fascinating.

Mr. POSNER: How about this one? You can get dentures made overnight in Florence, South Carolina.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. POSNER: You go in. They pull out your teeth.

SIMON: Ugh.

Mr. POSNER: You sleep over in a motel. And by the time you wake up in the morning, your dentures are ready. The price is so much less than at home. And then you, on your way back...

Mr. POSNER: And on your way back they will fine tune them for free.

Ms. POSNER: A checkup on your way back.

Mr. POSNER: It's called the Sexton Dental Clinic.

SIMON: Well, I have to confess something to you, Mr. and Mrs. Posner.

Mr. POSNER: Yeah?

SIMON: I approached this interview with some trepidation that I'd be talking to some very odd people. But...

Mr. POSNER: You're right.

SIMON: Well...

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIMON: ...you're delightful and you have rich lives. I've enjoyed hearing all this stuff.

Ms. POSNER: Thank you.

Ms. POSNER: As I said, we've been doing this seven years and there are places we cannot go by without stopping.

SIMON: Sam Posner and Sandra Phillips-Posner run the Web site DriveI-95.com. They joined us from Montreal.

Thanks so much.

Mr. POSNER: You're welcome.

Ms. POSNER: Happy trails.

SIMON: And you can find links to all the places the Posners mentioned on our Web site, NPR.org. NPR's series I-95: The Road Most Traveled concludes tomorrow on WEEKEND EDITION SUNDAY with a report on what Interstate 95 could look like in 50 years.

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