In College, Maybe Everybody IS Doing It: Cheating Is the NCAA capable of keeping student-athletes from skirting the rules? Anyone who thinks so should look at the University of North Carolina, says Frank Deford. If rules were broken there, it may be hard to find a team without a blemish.
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In College, Maybe Everybody IS Doing It: Cheating

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In College, Maybe Everybody IS Doing It: Cheating

In College, Maybe Everybody IS Doing It: Cheating

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

And now to college athletics and a reality check from sports commentator Frank Deford.

FRANK DEFORD: It's the old business of garbage in, garbage out. The various colleges - which is to say, the various athletic departments - report grades to the NCAA, which accepts them prima facie. How can the NCAA ever tell if some stooge is taking a test for an athlete? If some tutor is writing a term paper for an athlete? If some professor is dishing out passing grades to the failing athletes that he cheers for?

WERTHEIMER: If it makes you feel any better, I replied, yeah, probably - probably just about everybody. There are no referees in big-time college classrooms.

WERTHEIMER: This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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