Paris Fashion Week Features Preppy, Sporty, Upbeat This spring, look for stripes, bright colors, longer skirts, "sloppier" shoulder lines, and higher pant waistlines. Sally Singer, editor in chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, says what she's seen at Paris Fashion Week has been "very accessible."
NPR logo

Paris Fashion Week Features Preppy, Sporty, Upbeat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130219245/130234532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Paris Fashion Week Features Preppy, Sporty, Upbeat

Paris Fashion Week Features Preppy, Sporty, Upbeat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130219245/130234532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, Host:

The world's fashion designers, editors and buyers are in the middle of Paris Fashion Week right now. Last week they were in Milan, and London and New York's Fashion Weeks came just before that.

V: Good morning.

SALLY SINGER: Good morning.

SHAPIRO: Of the thousands of looks and articles of clothing that you've seen in the last few weeks, can you draw us a map of how they reach us, the consumers?

SINGER: So you have this very sporty, very accessible sense of pattern.

SHAPIRO: How do you get a single theme like that out of the dozens of shows that you're seeing, when I'm sure many people are doing very different things from one another?

SINGER: And why is that the case? Why do all designers - or why do a clutch of designers seize on a particular theme or a particular color? I think it's just more cultural. I think that the, sort of, eye that creates clothes is more and more reacting to a uniform culture. People are seeing the same movies, they're reading the same books, they're going to the same museum shows.

SHAPIRO: What are the books and movies and shows that you think are most influencing the fashion world right now?

SINGER: Well, I think last year, definitely "I Am Love," this was the fashion film of the year and...

SHAPIRO: This was the film with Tilda Swinton.

SINGER: Tilda Swinton, right. There's no question that Tilda appearing in a bright orange pant and a blue shirt, I think it was Ralph Simons for Jil Sander. I mean lots of people might have seen that film for many reasons. Fashion people saw it's an orange pant with a blue shirt, that looks really, really good.

SHAPIRO: So where do things stand now?

SINGER: But also, I think the good thing that's come out of all of this, is that an educated fashion consumer will buy the right things for the right reasons and they'll stop buying things just to have them. You know, it used to be go into a woman's closet, you'd see swing tags hanging off garments that were never going to be worn. They were for like a life that would never be lived or could be lived, or was being lived on, like, Planet Zog in the person's head.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SINGER: And now, I think that's over. I think people are buying things that they want to wear because those things will change their look enough, to make them feel connected to their time.

SHAPIRO: Thanks a lot.

SINGER: Thank you very much.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FASHION")

LADY GAGA: (Singing) Don't you want to see these clothes on me? Fashion...

SHAPIRO: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

GAGA: (Singing) Don't you want to see these clothes on me? I am anyone...

Copyright © 2010 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.