Sunlight That Transcends Prison Walls The Nobel Peace Prize makes Chinese dissident writer Liu Xiaobo a symbol. But more striking are the utterly personal words Mr. Liu wrote to his wife, the painter Liu Xia, when was sentenced to 11 years in prison last year.
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Sunlight That Transcends Prison Walls

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Sunlight That Transcends Prison Walls

Sunlight That Transcends Prison Walls

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

He's been in prison for seven of the last 20 years, convicted of calling for free speech, democracy and independent courts in China, where that's called subversion.

SIMON: not universal love but to be loved alone.

SIMON: The Chinese government has not just locked up a symbol named Liu Xiaobo but a human being who cannot hold those he loves.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: You're listening to NPR News.

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