Haitians Ponder Future A Year After Quake Numerous memorial services and Masses are taking place across Port-au-Prince Wednesday. But for many people, this anniversary is as much about this moment as it is about what happened a year ago.
NPR logo

Haitians Remember Quake Victims, Consider Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/132866197/132869036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Haitians Remember Quake Victims, Consider Future

Haitians Remember Quake Victims, Consider Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/132866197/132869036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

NPR's Jason Beaubien takes us there.

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

JASON BEAUBIEN: Unidentified Man: (speaking foreign language)

(SOUNDBITE OF SERMON)

BEAUBIEN: Unidentified Man: (speaking foreign language)

(SOUNDBITE OF SERMON)

BEAUBIEN: As Pope John Paul II said here in 1983, the cardinal warned, something must change in this country. He called on Haitians to be brave, work together and not give up as they enter the second year of the recovery from the disaster.

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

BEAUBIEN: Monsignor Louis Kebreau, the president of the Catholic Bishops Conference of Haiti, said Haitians must unite for a single cause.

LOUIS KEBREAU: SPEAKING FOREIGN LANGUAGE

BEAUBIEN: Today must mark the true reconstruction and healing of the country, Kebreau said.

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING)

BEAUBIEN: Thirty-nine-year-old Altagrace Charlotin was sitting on a pile of rubble in front of what used to be one of the stately wooden doors of the church.

ALTAGRACE CHARLOTIN: (Through translator) I don't think things are getting better. If you look around, the population is still under tents. Like I tell people, get yourself out of this. Don't wait for the government or international groups to come. Just like me, I fixed my home myself, did what I had to do. Even though I don't have the means to provide for myself, at least I repaired my home and I have a place to stay.

BEAUBIEN: For many people, this anniversary is as much about today as it is about what happened a year ago. At the golf course camp, Boncon Coulange runs a small shop from a stand in front of his shack. He sells cold drinks, canned milk, cigarettes. Coulange says things are getting worse in Haiti.

BONCON COULANGE: (speaking foreign language)

BEAUBIEN: Jason Beaubien, NPR News, Port-au-Prince.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.