Case Of Jailed Diplomat In Pakistan Fuels Anger Hundreds of Pakistanis are gathering at the site where a jailed U.S. diplomat allegedly shot and killed two Pakistani men who he says were armed robbers. Suspicion in the case of Raymond Davis is adding more ammunition to the anti-American sentiment.
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Case Of Jailed Diplomat In Pakistan Fuels Anger

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Case Of Jailed Diplomat In Pakistan Fuels Anger

Case Of Jailed Diplomat In Pakistan Fuels Anger

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

The U.S. insists that he is a diplomat entitled to immunity, but as NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from Lahore, the case has deepened distrust of Americans there and made granting immunity a tall order.

JULIE MCCARTHY: Unidentified Group: (Speaking in foreign language).

MCCARTHY: Unidentified Group: (Speaking in foreign language).

MCCARTHY: Yasmin Raashid is a member of the party formed by the popular former cricketer Imran Khan. Raashid says many Pakistanis do not believe Davis is a diplomat, as the Americans say, but more likely a security operative along the lines of the much-loathed Blackwater, now called Xe.

YASMIN RAASHID: We have a lot of feelings. There's a lot of resentment that Blackwater, or whatever security people, they are around here in Pakistan, and they are trying to undermine our sovereignty.

MCCARTHY: How do you feel Davis was undermining the sovereignty of Pakistan?

RAASHID: A person takes the law into his own hand and shoots to kill.

MCCARTHY: Rahman says the hostility erupting over the case of the jailed American is an extension of the furor over the blasphemy debate where, in defense of Islam, the radical right has whipped up an anti-Western fervor.

RASHED RAHMAN: An issue like this is just going to add more ammunition to that anti-American sentiment. And Mr. Davis has provided a most wonderful opportunity to raise the bar even higher. And I think the mood on the street is something that needs to be watched. I'm not saying its Egypt or Tunisia, but I'm just saying the street, at least the religious right, could explode.

MCCARTHY: Julie McCarthy, NPR News, Lahore.

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