Obama Discusses Faith At National Prayer Breakfast Hosts Robert Siegel and Michele Norris tell us about Thursday's National Prayer Breakfast in Washington. President Obama spoke about his faith at the annual event. Mark Kelly — the husband of Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords — also attended.
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Obama Discusses Faith At National Prayer Breakfast

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Obama Discusses Faith At National Prayer Breakfast

Obama Discusses Faith At National Prayer Breakfast

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

Before heading to Pennsylvania today, President Obama addressed the annual national prayer breakfast.

BARACK OBAMA: The presidency has a funny way of making a person feel the need to pray.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

NORRIS: President Obama spoke about how prayer has sustained him since he took office.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

And there was another special guest at today's national prayer breakfast, Captain Mark Kelly, the husband of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. He said the shootings in Tucson had changed his view of fate.

MARK KELLY: I hadn't been a big believer in fate until recently. I thought the world just spins and the clock just ticks and things happen for no particular reason.

NORRIS: Captain Kelly, an astronaut, said maybe something good can come from the tragedy.

KELLY: Maybe it's our responsibility. Maybe it's your responsibility to see that something does.

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