Joanne Siegel, Model For Lois Lane, Dies At 93 The wife of Superman creator Jerry Siegel, she posed in her teens for Siegel's collaborator, artist Joe Shuster, who's said to have used her image as the inspiration for the iconic comic book reporter Lois Lane. Joanne Siegel died Feb. 12 at 93.
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Joanne Siegel, Model For Lois Lane, Dies At 93

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Joanne Siegel, Model For Lois Lane, Dies At 93

Joanne Siegel, Model For Lois Lane, Dies At 93

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From member station WCPN in Cleveland, David C. Barnett reports.

DAVID C: It all began with the dreams of a teenage Cleveland girl who wanted to be in show business, a tall order for the daughter of a steelworker in the midst of the Depression. But popular culture historian Brad Ricca at Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University says that didn't faze her.

BRAD RICCA: She wanted to be a model, so she put an ad in the paper advertising herself as a model.

BARNETT: Brad Ricca says that in later years, Joanne was a strong advocate for her husband's royalty rights. He got little compensation for the millions that the Superman character generated.

RICCA: She was this really unique person in the history of American comics not only for what she did but for the fact that she was a woman. She got in there as a model but stayed through as a businesswoman.

BARNETT: Two years ago, on a rainy summer afternoon, Joanne Siegel was on the porch at the house where her late husband dreamed up the guy in the red cape and his girlfriend. The 91-year-old recalled attending a Superman convention with Jerry in Sweden.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

JOANNA SIEGEL: We met people from China and Germany and Australia and New Zealand, all over. It was amazing because "Superman" is known everywhere.

BARNETT: For NPR News, I'm David C. Barnett in Cleveland.

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