General Motors To Invest Billions In 17 Factories General Motors CEO Dan Akerson says his company will invest $2 billion to upgrade 17 plants. The company also plans to hire up to 4,000 people. About 2,000 of them will come from the company's pool of laid-off workers.
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General Motors To Invest Billions In 17 Factories

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General Motors To Invest Billions In 17 Factories

General Motors To Invest Billions In 17 Factories

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

General Motors says it's investing $2 billion in 17 American factories. This comes after the company announced its fifth straight quarterly profit since emerging from bankruptcy.

Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports the new investment could mean new jobs.

(Soundbite of music)

TRACY SAMILTON: So the rock music blasting at GM's Toledo Transmission plant isn't exactly "Happy Days Are Here Again."�But Matt Jaworskis feeling pretty happy.�Hes only a temp worker, but hes got no complaints.

Mr. MATT JAWORSKI (General Motors): Things arent the greatest out there, these days, for jobs, so when you get an opportunity like this, you got to take it, he says

SAMILTON: Elizabeth Sammut says it was really depressing when GM went bankrupt two years ago, and early this year she got laid off. But she's been rehired at Toledo where GM is investing $200 million to build a new fuel-efficient eight speed transmission.

Ms. ELIZABETH SAMMUT (General Motors): I have a whole new outlook and its just totally changed my mood, and I think a lot of peoples moods, too.

SAMILTON: GM CEO Dan Akerson is happy too, though he cautions the company has a long way to go. When asked about the upcoming contract talks with the UAW, he says the once bitter relationship between the two sides has changed.

Mr. DAN AKERSON (CEO, GM): Neither one of us want to be considered bad management, or greedy union, or greedy management, bad union.

SAMILTON: Thats not to say there wont be some fights. Like whether GM should make more of its�temp workers permanent. But for now, both sides are emphasizing the positives: new transmissions, new jobs and a profitable American car company.

For NPR News, I'm Tracy Samilton in Ann Arbor.

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