Naipaul's Comments Reflective Of 'Hubris' The Nobel laureate V.S. Naipaul told an interviewer in London this week that no woman could ever be his literary match. In a spirited response, guest host Jacki Lyden defends women of letters.
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Naipaul's Comments Reflective Of 'Hubris'

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Naipaul's Comments Reflective Of 'Hubris'

Naipaul's Comments Reflective Of 'Hubris'

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JACKI LYDEN, Host:

This past week, the Nobel laureate V.S. Naipaul was interviewed at the Royal Geographic Society in London about his phenomenal career, which spans six decades. It should have been a glorious moment. Instead, Sir Vidia told an interviewer that no woman could ever be his literary match. Then he singled out Jane Austen and said that he couldn't possibly share her sentimental ambitions, her sentimental sense of the world.

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