Syrian Refugees Make Do With Little Near Border Syrians fleeing government have gathered for safety at the Turkish border, telling stories of how government tanks chased them from their homes. Many here say they haven't followed the roughly 9,000 Syrians already in Turkey because they're waiting for family members still trying to get by army checkpoints.
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Syrian Refugees Make Do With Little Near Border

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Syrian Refugees Make Do With Little Near Border

Syrian Refugees Make Do With Little Near Border

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

We're going to focus in this part of the program on the ongoing unrest in Syria and Libya. First, Syria, where thousands of people displaced by a violent government crackdown are making their way over rough mountain roads and trails. They're heading toward the country's northwestern corner.

In a valley framed on one side by Syrian mountains and on the other by the Turkish border, tents and blankets dot the hillside.

NPR's Peter Kenyon made his way across the border from Turkey today to hear the stories of these refugees.

(Soundbite of splashing water)

ALI: Syria hurra.

PETER KENYON: Just outside the Syrian village of Khirbet al-Jouz, a 27-year-old Syrian named Ali splashes water on his face in a muddy creek and jokingly cries out, Syria hurra. Free Syria, for these displaced farm families, is a long valley studded with evergreens and strewn with boulders.

To the west, Syria, where these people say their relatives report the army continues to occupy towns and villages, and arrest and shoot people. To the east, safety in Turkey, albeit under heavy restrictions.

Many of the people interviewed here today had similar stories of deception and death, of families enticed to return to their homes by messages saying everything was safe, only to have their homes shot at or shelled by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad. Stories of random killings and rape could not be verified but were widespread.

As to why more people haven't followed the roughly 9,000 Syrians already in Turkey, many here say they're waiting for family members still trying to make it past or around army checkpoints to get here.

What people find in these makeshift camps are the barest of subsistence conditions, but just at the moment, that seems like a pretty good deal compared with what they left behind.

(Soundbite of crying)

KENYON: In a tent cobbled together from blue tarps, sacks and blankets, a baby swings in a makeshift hammock. His father Abu Ahmed says at the moment nothing could convince him to bring his wife and 10 children home to face the army or President Bashar al-Assad's militiamen.

Mr. ABU AHMED: (Through Translator) It's not easy here. The water is dirty. There's not enough food. But by God, we will stay here till the very last minute. If the Syrian army comes here, then we'll try to cross into Turkey.

KENYON: In a nearby fruit tree orchard, a man who gives his name as Abu Ayman says his wife and children are already in Turkey, but he's waiting for permission to bring the family car across. He says he has no problem staying in Turkey temporarily, but even better would be if the Turkish army set up a buffer zone in this valley.

Mr. ABU AYMAN: (Through Translator) Yes, we'd agree with that. And we thank Prime Minister Erdogan. He's better than our president. Our President Bashar al-Assad, who kills his own people, is a traitor. If the Turks make a safe zone here, that would be great.

KENYON: The idea of a Turkish buffer zone inside Syria has reportedly been discussed in Ankara, but analysts say putting Turkish troops on Syrian soil would likely be a last resort.

For now, the Turks are allowing a limited number of food and medicine convoys to come here. But as more Syrians pour into this valley, such stopgap measures may not be enough.

Peter Kenyon, NPR News.

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