When Athletes Play Dirty, Government's Bats Clean Up Yes, America takes its games too seriously. But sport is an institution that stands for playing by the rules. That's why the government has a duty to pursue athletes who use drugs to cheat. The goal of sports is victory, but the essence is fairness.
NPR logo

When Athletes Play Dirty, Government's Bats Clean Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137606017/137643506" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
When Athletes Play Dirty, Government's Bats Clean Up

When Athletes Play Dirty, Government's Bats Clean Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137606017/137643506" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And we have more on the subject from NPR's banned substances correspondent, Frank Deford.

FRANK DEFORD: The goal of sports is victory, but the essence is fairness. What's the first question a kid asks entering a game? What are the rules? If we Americans don't accept playing by the rules in sport, where else do we lay down that marker? That's what's serious about sport. And why, yes, although we are weary of all the doping distractions, why it is worth the while of governments to go after athletes - especially the celebrities who might have cheated their games - and cheated what a very visual institution in our society teaches us. Yes, it's time and money. But yes, it's only fair.

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.