Prediction Our panelists predict how we'll get our AAA credit rating back.
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Prediction

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Prediction

Prediction

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PETER SAGAL, Host:

Now panel, how will this nation get our AAA credit rating back? Paula Poundstone?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Well, my understanding is we went from a AAA to a AA plus, and therefore, to get back to the AAA, we're going to have to do extra credit, maybe write a report, do a poster, perhaps a diorama or a mobile.

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SAGAL: Tom Bodett?

TOM BODETT: Same thing as Paula. It's the same way I changed my C in eighth grade grammar to an A. You take an eraser and you rub, rub, rub, rub, rub until the C disappears and then you write, write, write, write A really deeply and spill a coke on the whole report card before you show it to your mom.

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SAGAL: And Adam Felber?

ADAM FELBER: We're going to do it the way we always do it and just send in the Marines to liberate Standard and Poor's.

SAGAL: There you go.

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CARL KASELL, Host:

Well, if any of that happens, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME.

SAGAL: Thank you so much, Carl Kasell. Thanks to Adam Felber, Paula Poundstone and Tom Bodett. Thanks to our fabulous audience here at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.

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SAGAL: Thanks to everybody at KUAC. And thanks to all of you for listening. I am Peter Sagal. We'll see you all next week.

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SAGAL: This is NPR.

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