We're All Just 'Guys' It used to be that guys were guys and girls were girls. But now everyone's a guy and Frank Deford is confused.
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We're All Just 'Guys'

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We're All Just 'Guys'

We're All Just 'Guys'

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DAVID GREENE, Host:

It's Wednesday and that means we hear from commentator Frank Deford. As many of you have come to learn over the years, he loves language as much as he loves sports. And today, he's fixated on one word. A word he thinks has become too inclusive.

FRANK DEFORD: What accounts for the guy-ification of America? Maybe it has to do with the fact that men had to stop calling grown women girls. Gals kind of went out, too, so there wasn't anything else available. In sports, for a long time, even after it was gauche for anyone else to call adult females girls, women athletes still referred to each other as girls, but that just won't do anymore.

S: Yo, dude, let's stop guying.

GREENE: That's commentator Frank Deford who joins us each Wednesday from WSHU in Fairfield, Connecticut.

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