Your Letters: Linda Wertheimer's Fruitcake Recipe Among the letters we received this week, many listeners shared their love of autumn in response to guest host Linda Wertheimer's essay on the simple joys of the season. In response, we're sharing her mother's fruitcake recipe.
NPR logo

Your Letters: Linda Wertheimer's Fruitcake Recipe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142506308/142542024" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Your Letters: Linda Wertheimer's Fruitcake Recipe

Your Letters: Linda Wertheimer's Fruitcake Recipe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/142506308/142542024" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPING AND MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: Last Saturday, we brought you a story about a new museum opening in Bentonville, Arkansas - the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, which is funded by Wal-Mart heiress Alice Walton.

Dani McKinney of Dunkirk, New York writes: How ambitious to decide to create an amazing art museum in a place between the coasts - accessible to everyone and the price of admission? Free.

Nancy Gray of Madison, Wisconsin had a different take. She writes: It's wonderful that Ms. Walton is bringing culture to her city. But imagine what a portion of that money could do to improve the quality of life of her hardworking employees at the Wal-Marts across the country. It was announced earlier this month that Wal-Mart would no longer offer health insurance benefits to its part-time workers.

Many listeners shared their love of autumn in response to my essay on the simple joys of the season. Michael Ehl of Issaquah, Washington sent this note: I connected immediately with Linda's essay on autumn; her appreciation for a singular maple leaf, the claiming of this ideal time of year between Halloween and Thanksgiving.

That essay included one of my childhood memories of the season - the house filled with the scent of bourbon as my mom made fruitcakes for my dad's customers at his neighborhood grocery store.

That prompted Gary Cooke of Seattle, Washington to write: As a fan of that much maligned food group, the fruitcake, I wish you would share the recipe. All day today I've been trying to imagine the aroma of lemons and bourbon rising from a light golden cake.

Thank you for all your kind words. My mother's recipe made 40 fruitcakes, but she slimmed it down before she gave it to me. And you can find it at NPR.org.

Finally, lots of comments on our website following our interview marking the 40th anniversary of the Led Zeppelin classic "Stairway to Heaven." Including this one from Jerry B. of Philadelphia: I hate to admit it, but this song probably caused me to become a guitarist in the '80s, a phenomenon so ubiquitous it was satirized by Mike Myers' "Wayne's World" in a scene at a music store, where his character is stopped mid-strum and shown a sign on the wall that says, No Stairway to Heaven.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN")

WERTHEIMER: No restrictions on your comments, though. We welcome your letters. To write us, visit our website, NPR.org and click on the Contact Us link. You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter @ NPRWeekend. This is NPR News.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.