Quake Rattles Sumatra, Triggers Tsunami Warning An earthquake off the Indonesian island of Sumatra badly damaged buildings along the coast, killing several people and triggering tsunami warnings for much of the Indian Ocean region.
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Quake Rattles Sumatra, Triggers Tsunami Warning

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Quake Rattles Sumatra, Triggers Tsunami Warning

Quake Rattles Sumatra, Triggers Tsunami Warning

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MADELEINE BRAND, host:

This is DAY TO DAY. I'm Madeleine Brand.

ROBERT SMITH, host:

And I'm Robert Smith.

A strong earthquake hit Indonesia today. The magnitude 8.2 quake damaged buildings and triggered a small tsunami off the coast of the island of Sumatra, but nothing like the one that devastated the country three years ago.

BRAND: Reporter Chad Bouchard is in Jakarta talking to people near the epicenter.

CHAD BOUCHARD: There were buildings shaken to the ground, so we know that there has been some property damage. We don't know about injuries at this point. We know that a hospital was evacuated. And we know also there are cracks in many buildings, and people are sleeping outside for fear of an aftershock or another quake.

BRAND: A tsunami rising as high as six feet reportedly hit the city of Padang. More than a million people live there Casualty reports are sketchy so far. Rescue organizations are sending people to the region.

BOUCHARD: The Red Cross here in Jakarta, they don't have enough information at this point to launch a rescue, but it's really difficult still, communication-wise, to tell what's going on on the ground along the coast of Sumatra, which is the worst hit.

SMITH: Ten minutes after the quake, officials issued a tsunami warning over radio and television to residents living around that part of the Indian Ocean. Those warnings have now been dropped. Reporter Chad Bouchard says the tsunami alert system appears to be working.

BOUCHARD: That infrastructure is good and has been working fairly well. People have sort of a hair-trigger in terms of, you know, when they hear a warning, they immediately go for high ground. Indonesia still needs tsunami warning buoys and infrastructure like that. There's a good local effort, but it needs to be bolstered.

SMITH: That's Chad Bouchard reporting from Jakarta, Indonesia today.

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