Open Wide And Say Yee-Haw! Dentist Goes West In Song A Montana songwriter recounts the tale of his dentist's journey to becoming a cowboy.
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Open Wide And Say Yee-Haw! Dentist Goes West In Song

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Open Wide And Say Yee-Haw! Dentist Goes West In Song

Open Wide And Say Yee-Haw! Dentist Goes West In Song

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, in much the same way Alexander was inspired by Simon Norton's ability to live on his own terms, Montana songwriter D.W. Groethe was moved by a friend who years ago, gave up a successful career to follow a dream.

D.W. GROETHE: He was my dentist.

MARTIN: Groethe wrote a song about his former dentist. We hear more in this installment of "What's in a Song?"

(SOUNDBITE OF A SONG, "ONE FOR THE WORKING COWBOY")

(SOUNDBITE OF A SONG, "ONE FOR THE WORKING COWBOY")

(SOUNDBITE OF A SONG, "ONE FOR THE WORKING COWBOY")

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: "What's in a Song?" is produced by Hal Cannon and Taki Telonidis, of the Western Folklife Center.

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