Sports, the Rodney Dangerfield of Academia? Princeton Athletic Director Gary Walters says it is unfair that sports get less academic respect than drama or music. Frank Deford agrees, saying the sports-arts divide smacks of hypocrisy.
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Sports, the Rodney Dangerfield of Academia?

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Sports, the Rodney Dangerfield of Academia?

Sports, the Rodney Dangerfield of Academia?

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Commentator Frank Deford weighs in.

FRANK DEFORD: I also believe that sport has suffered because until recently, athletic performance could not be preserved. What we accepted as great art - whether the book, the script, the painting, the symphony - is that which could be saved and savored. But the performances of the athletic artists who ran and jumped and wrestled were gone with the win.

M: So, yes, Walters' argument makes for fair game. Is sport one of the arts? Or, just because you can bet on something, does that disqualify it as a thing of beauty?

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DEBORAH AMOS, Host:

And I'm Deborah Amos.

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