The Story of No Hurricane Hello from Bryant Park, where everyone's still talking about Sen. Larry Craig's big interview.
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The Story of No Hurricane

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The Story of No Hurricane

The Story of No Hurricane

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LUKE BURBANK, host:

This is THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News, your home for news information. Today: serious, in-depth public radio discussion of cupcakes.

I'm Luke Burbank.

ALISON STEWART, host:

And I'm Alison Stewart. It is Wednesday, October 17th.

BURBANK: Also on the show today, we're going to talk about FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, trying to get some of the people displaced by Hurricane Katrina to move out of those FEMA trailers that we've heard so much about. They're trying to dangle a little bit of incentive monetarily. We're going to talk to someone who's living in one of these trailers and ask if she's going to take the deal.

STEWART: And it is a national day of mourning in Macedonia today. Why? Well, their country's biggest pop star died in a car crash. We'll find out more about the man some people called the Balkan Elvis.

BURBANK: We're also going to get today's headlines from Rachel Martin in just a moment. First, though, we'll get right to the BPP's Big Story.

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