Fallen Reggae Star One of South Africa's most popular reggae stars, Lucky Dube, was murdered this week in a suburb of Johannesburg. The high-profile murder has sent shockwaves through South Africa, which has one of the world's worst murder rates.
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Fallen Reggae Star

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Fallen Reggae Star

Fallen Reggae Star

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MICHEL MARTIN, host:

The reggae world is mourning today. South Africa's star, Lucky Dube, was killed in an apparent carjacking attempt. Dube recorded more than 20 albums. He switched to reggae in the 1980s, he said, to better express his anger against South Africa's formerly all-white minority government. He toured widely in and out of South Africa and just recently completed a month-long concert tour. Lucky Dube, dead at the age of 43.

(Soundbite of song)

Mr. LUCKY DUBE (Singing): Fallen through a party beyond the night. They said he's going to need a lot of things. But when we were at the party, I won't disappoint you. Calling me this day was there a (unintelligible). Won't leave you in tears…

MARTIN: I'm Michel Martin. You are listening to TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Barber Shop is next.

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