Texas Collector Buys Lock of Che Guevara's Hair Bill Butler, who owns a Texas bookstore and collects 60's memorabilia, bought one of the ultimate mementos of that age: about a hundred strands of hair from Che Guevara. Butler paid $119,000 for the hair, a set of Guevara's fingerprints, pictures of him in death, and maps used to find him.
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Texas Collector Buys Lock of Che Guevara's Hair

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Texas Collector Buys Lock of Che Guevara's Hair

Texas Collector Buys Lock of Che Guevara's Hair

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

This week, Bill Butler, who owns a Texas bookstore and collects '60s memorabilia, bought one of the ultimate mementos of that age - about 100 strands of hair from Che Guevarra.

Gustavo Villoldo, a Cuban-born CIA operative who helped Bolivian troops capture Che Guevarra in 1967, snipped the strands before Che was executed. Mr. Butler says he admires Che and told reporters he was, quote, "one of the great revolutionaries of the 20th century."

Rene Barrientos, who teaches math at Miami Dade College and is the son of the General Barrientos, who was the head of Bolivia at the time, told The New York Times this week he is puzzled by the adulation and says there is no basis to admire him. He destroyed a lot of lives.

Earlier this year, three strands of Abraham Lincoln's hair - head or beard - I don't know - sold for a little over $11,000, a whole lock of Mr. Lincoln's hair sold for 21,000. Bill Butler paid 119,000. That price includes a set of Che Guevarra's fingerprints, pictures of him in death and maps the Bolivian military used to find him.

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