Elvis, Andy and Bob Keep Earning in the Afterlife Forbes Magazine has released its new list of Top-Earning Dead Celebrities. Elvis, of course, rules the list.
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Elvis, Andy and Bob Keep Earning in the Afterlife

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Elvis, Andy and Bob Keep Earning in the Afterlife

Elvis, Andy and Bob Keep Earning in the Afterlife

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

Forbes magazine has an annual list of the wealthiest people in the world. As a generalization, they are alive. But Forbes doesn't want to overlook the contributions that deceased peoples make to the world economy. For the past seven years, it's presented an annual list of Top-Earning Dead Celebrities.

Topping this year's list, as you might imagine, is Elvis Presley, who earned $49 million. He's followed by John Lennon, Charles Schultz, the father of "Peanuts," and another inanimate Beatle, George Harrison. Albert Einstein is number five. It must be all those parents buying baby Einstein videos so their children can hum ta-du-du-am(ph) over the kids next door. Andy Warhol is number six, followed by Dr. Seuss, Tupac Shakur, Marilyn Monroe, Steve McQueen, James Brown, who's new to the list, having only recently departed, and Bob Marley and James Dean.

Together, these morto(ph) Americans, Britons and a Jamaican earned $232 million last year for their own survivors.

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