Voices In the News: Bhutto and Musharraf A sound montage of some of the voices in this past week's news, including: Benazir Bhutto, former Pakistan prime minister; Gen. Pervez Musharraf, president of Pakistan; and Sen. Hillary Clinton (D, NY).
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Voices In the News: Bhutto and Musharraf

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Voices In the News: Bhutto and Musharraf

Voices In the News: Bhutto and Musharraf

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

And these were some of the voices in the news this past week.

PERVEZ MUSHARRAF: Inaction at this moment is suicide for Pakistan, and I cannot allow this country to commit suicide.

BENAZIR BHUTTO: If General Musharraf wants to kick start the negotiations again for a peaceful transition, then he must revive the constitution, retire as chief of army staff by November 15 and hold elections as scheduled under a newly constituted Election Commission.

HOWARD ERICSON: Merck decided to litigate case after case. And by doing that, I think, they were able to drive down the settlement value of the cases. In this case, they gambled correctly, most people think.

JIM FITZPATRICK: It really lets them get back to do and what it is that Merck does. And that's to develop new medicines and new vaccines and to get those to patients.

CHARLES SCHUMER: There is still a chance with somebody who is regarded as thoughtful, independent and a lawyer above all that he may - he may find on his own that waterboarding and other coercive techniques are illegal.

DIANNE FEINSTEIN: But I don't believe that Judge Mukasey should be denied confirmation for failing to provide an absolute answer on this one subject.

MITCH MCCONNELL: It shouldn't have taken nearly this long to process the Mukasey nomination. I'm glad that tonight, almost two months after he was nominated, the waiting will finally end and that he will soon get to work at the Justice Department.

JAMES INHOFE: I happen to be rated by the American Conservative Union and several organizations not number two, I'd say to my friends in Colorado. Not number three but number one most conservative member of the United States Senate, and yet, I'm standing here asking this Senate to override the president's veto.

HARRY REID: The minute the vote was announced by the presiding officer, that bill became law. And I want Democrats and Republicans to understand how historic it was that we did that.

HILLARY CLINTON: And I will restore the pride and progress in America that should be our birthright. That's who America is. We want to be proud again. We want to be progressive again. And we will when I am president.

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