The Literary Legacy of Norman Mailer Pulitzer-prize winning novelist Norman Mailer died Saturday morning, at the age of 84. Literary critic Bill Marx shares his remembrance of the provocative American novelist.
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The Literary Legacy of Norman Mailer

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The Literary Legacy of Norman Mailer

The Literary Legacy of Norman Mailer

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Critic Bill Marx has this appreciation.

BILL MARX: At his best, Mailer was not driven by ego alone. His generation assumed that what novel said had the power to make a difference. Norman Mailer may have abused the privilege, but his career is a valuable reminder of that now anachronistic belief.

HANSEN: Critic Bill Marx teaches contemporary fiction in the writing program at Boston University.

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