Luxury Tech Toys Wrapped in Gold and Gems If you need a gift for a special geek — and you have a few thousand dollars to spare — you might consider these "luxury technology" items: a Les Paul guitar that tunes itself, a remote control made out of pure gold, and an iPhone encrusted with diamonds for $41,227.
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Luxury Tech Toys Wrapped in Gold and Gems

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Luxury Tech Toys Wrapped in Gold and Gems

Luxury Tech Toys Wrapped in Gold and Gems

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Okay, toddlers are not the only ones who'd like to find a digital camera in the stocking. If you need a gift for that special adult geek in your life and you have a few thousand dollars to spare, you might consider luxury technology, which is our last word in business today.

PC magazine has a list of luxury-tech items for the 2007 holiday season. And on that list, you will find a Les Paul guitar that tunes itself. There's also a remote control made out of pure gold. And if you're thinking an ordinary iPhone is just not enough, how about one that's encrusted with diamonds. The Amosu Diamond iPhone also includes one free year of international concierge service and not to ship by Christmas, but this can all be yours for the price of $41,227.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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