Working on Christmas Hear some ways the BPP staff makes the most out of working on Christmas.
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Working on Christmas

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Working on Christmas

Working on Christmas

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RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Now, I don't know if any of you out there have ever had to work on a holiday, or Christmas Day, in particular, but let us tell you a little bit about what it's like. There's this special kind of bond that you share with people who have to work on a Christmas Day.

ALISON STEWART, host:

It's true.

MARTIN: Don't you think?

STEWART: I went to (unintelligible) coffee this morning on my way into work, and the little guy at the diner was so happy. He was, oh, someone has to work today. I thought I was only one.

MARTIN: And at first, you get a little bond, you're annoyed. But then, you can try to make it fun, you know?

STEWART: Absolutely.

MARTIN: Have some sticky buns, some presents - (unintelligible) brought in presents. (unintelligible) today.

STEWART: And you brought those sticky buns. (Unintelligible) brought us in this amazing chocolate gold reindeer.

MARTIN: Mm-hmm.

STEWART: And that (unintelligible) Easter, all I want to do is bite the ears off it like the bunny.

MARTIN: Yeah.

STEWART: I know, (unintelligible) says about me.

MARTIN: We need more chocolate around here.

And our favorite senior supervising producer, despite having a late Christmas Eve came in, wearing a little Santa Claus hat and (unintelligible).

STEWART: Yeah - been really on fire with a certain set of Christmas carols.

MARTIN: Mm-hmm.

STEWART: Matt Martinez has a thing for Jingle Cats.

(Soundbite of music)

STEWART: And it's pretty much has the office divided, you'll understand why we need the (unintelligible).

(Soundbite of music)

MARTIN: We're sorry.

STEWART: See, I think it's hilarious.

MARTIN: We're so sorry. See, Alison and I are in opposite sides of the fence here.

STEWART: The office is divided about Jingle Cats.

(Soundbite of laughter)

STEWART: Whether or not - oh, here comes Matt to defend Jingle Cats, I just love them.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MATT MARTINEZ: I got to tell you something, there is no reason to apologize for Jingle Cats. This is a wildly popular album. People love this among cat aficionados, if you've ever read Cat Fancy magazine…

STEWART: Cat Fancy magazine?

MARTINEZ: …it's everywhere. It's brilliant. You know, let's hear a little bit more.

(Soundbite of music)

MARTIN: I'm going to go (unintelligible) in the head.

STEWART: I do, you know - some people want to (unintelligible) traffic when they hear this. Others make a giggle. I just - the record - no real cats were used during - were harmed during the making…

MARTIN: (unintelligible) yeah.

STEWART: They're actually samples of cats. I discovered (unintelligible).

MARTIN: You mean, cat samples?

STEWART: Cat sampling.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTINEZ: Actually, Ian Chillag, one of our producers, this morning said, you know, I'm pretty sure all of the cats that made this recording are probably dead now.

So - but, actually that's not true because they're all electronic. And they're not…

STEWART: Can we move on to another fine tune?

MARTINEZ: Yes. No, no, no. These are dogs now.

STEWART: Oh.

MARTINEZ: Yeah, dogs, cats living together. It's Christmas.

MARTIN: The Christmas message of unity.

STEWART: Solidarity.

MARTINEZ: All right, I'm going to go back to producing the show. Happy holidays, guys. Bye-bye.

MARTIN: Bye, Matt.

STEWART: Bye.

(Soundbite of music)

STEWART: I don't think I've ever seen him move that fast as to come in here and defending Jingle Cats.

(Soundbite of music)

MARTIN: Are we going to play the entire (unintelligible).

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: I think that…

(Soundbite of music)

MARTIN: …write to us on our blog. Tell us, what do you think about Jingle Cats? Oh, don't. It's okay. You don't have to.

STEWART: I like it. I just keep listening.

MARTIN: There is something strangely addictive…

STEWART: All right. We have a minute left. We'll do the (unintelligible).

MARTIN: All right. We'll tell you what's coming up. No more Jingle Cats, I promise.

STEWART: There's so much better than that. Our own Jill Sobule, opinionated songstress and friend of the show, unlike Christmas is actually the saddest day of the year.

MARTIN: Bummer.

STEWART: Yeah, and actually it's a double-edge story here…

MARTIN: Okay.

STEWART: …because she wrote a song about Christmas being the saddest day of the year but it got her on a year end best of list.

MARTIN: So she's not so bum.

STEWART: So she's not so bum. And she also - she will sing a very happy Christmas song for us as well.

MARTIN: Okay. Cool.

STEWART: And I - gosh. I love Rudolf. I love Frosty. I love Heat Miser, Snow Miser.

MARTIN: I know.

STEWART: All those specials we know we love. We'll share some things that you didn't know about them. That's coming up on THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News live on Christmas morning.

MARTIN: No more Jingle Cats.

STEWART: Maybe.

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