Oddball Team Owners in America's Sports London's The Observer newspaper annually chooses the World's Oddest Owner in soccer. Can American owners compete with Europe's looniest? You bet they can.
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Oddball Team Owners in America's Sports

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Oddball Team Owners in America's Sports

Oddball Team Owners in America's Sports

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And yet, commentator Frank Deford tells us that some of the most unusual behavior in sports this year actually occurred on the sidelines.

FRANK DEFORD: Owners tend to be a very eclectic lot, although most are usually self-made men who built up a fortune and some other enterprise and then assume it's just as easy to be successful in sports. A few do wisely realize they have no aptitude for this new business, and Milton had it, only stand and wait as they put up the cash. Famously, one asked his general manager what he might do for the franchise. You're an owner, Ed, the GM replied, own.

M: The Observer's tributes, notwithstanding, we can take pride as Americans, that both the worst and the oddest sports owner in the world is now James Dolan. Yes, we're number one.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

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